Windows Package Manager: Microsoft's new attempt to attract more Linux users

Microsoft announced a couple of days ago the Windows Package Manager, a new concept that Linux users know very well and that aims to make installing programs much simpler.

Windows Package Manager is a new system inspired by the Linux world, that is why it was announced during the Microsoft Build, the developer conference that was held a couple of days ago.

As many of us know, Microsoft is interested in copying some of the functions of Linux and after releasing Windows Subsystem for Linux, including the second version that will arrive in the May 2020 update, it makes a lot of sense that they now release a package manager.

And it is thanks to the package manager that Microsoft makes Windows 10 feel familiar to Linux users and this is essential considering that the Linux community has grown a lot recently.

By launching a package manager, Microsoft makes it clear that there is room for everyone in Windows 10, including Linux users.

And there is no doubt that Linux users will love this new feature, especially those who installed the subsystem on their devices.

How to use Windows Package Manager

Linux users will find that it is very easy to use the package manager and it all comes down to the command winget, for example, to install a program you should only use:

winget install app name

You can use all these self-explanatory commands:

  • hash
  • help
  • install
  • search
  • Show
  • source
  • validate

The applications that can be installed with winget they first have to be manually validated by Microsoft. This is the main reason why Microsoft decided to create its own package manager and not use an open project.

At the moment, Windows Package Manager is still a preview, which means it is a work in progress and the final version will arrive later.

Microsoft has launched the program Windows Package Insider, which essentially allows you to test this new tool before it goes out to the general public, you can apply for this program at this link.


The content of the article adheres to our principles of editorial ethics. To report an error click here!.

2 comments, leave yours

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

*

*

  1. Responsible for the data: AB Internet Networks 2008 SL
  2. Purpose of the data: Control SPAM, comment management.
  3. Legitimation: Your consent
  4. Communication of the data: The data will not be communicated to third parties except by legal obligation.
  5. Data storage: Database hosted by Occentus Networks (EU)
  6. Rights: At any time you can limit, recover and delete your information.

  1.   exhibition said

    Is this site called linuxadictos or windowsadictos?

    - And it's thanks to the package manager that Microsoft makes Windows 10 feel familiar to Linux users

    - By launching a package manager, Microsoft makes it clear that there is room for everyone in Windows 10, including Linux users.

    - And there is no doubt that Linux users will love this new feature

    But what kind of nonsense is this?

    A linux user who installs via console is not going to run to install the nefarious (https://es.thefreedictionary.com/nefasto) windows10 precisely because of that.

    The last Windows that I tried was windows vista, and precisely because of what I didn't like, which was that every little bit it asked you for permissions.
    Of course, I was not going to turn off everything for what I did not ask, which turned out to be more than what I asked for.

    I continue with gentoo that does only what I want, neither more nor less and on top of that it does it well.

    I do not put performance comparisons between my gentoo and the W10 of my daughter's laptop, because they are embarrassing.

    1.    Diego German Gonzalez said

      Although I do not agree with Luis's interpretation, I do agree that we should publish this article. Whoever likes it Microsoft is today a major player in the open source world. In fact, it is one of the most important contributors to kernel development.